Brion Raffoul Supports Local Food Bank

The Brion Raffoul team was proud to make a donation to Partage Vanier through the proceeds of our holiday bake sale and a matched donation by the firm. It was fitting that we gave back to this amazing community on our move day(!) after being there for 8 years.  

Partage Vanier is the most used food bank in Ontario, feeding approximately 450 families a month. The foodbank relies solely on donations from the community to feed its patrons. To donate to Partage Vanier click here.

Natalie Raffoul Named IAM Global Leader

Brion Raffoul is pleased to announce that Natalie Raffoul has been selected as an IAM Global Leader. “When it comes to business method and software patents, few are as knowledgeable as Natalie Raffoul. More than just a prosecution pro, she is a savvy strategist who understands how to secure commercial advantages for clients in global marketplaces.” Click here to find out more.

As a patent agent, Ms. Raffoul specializes in procuring IP assets for her Canadian clients worldwide.  She also advises on worldwide IP filing strategies and portfolio management, which includes trade secret considerations.  Her technology expertise includes: electronics, communications and networking, manufacturing, consumer products, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, and mobile applications.

As a lawyer, Natalie also advises on IP enforcement issues, in the pre-litigation context, and she is an expert in negotiating successful agreements for her clients, that cover IP rights in Canada and globally. 

Natalie holds a degree in electrical engineering from Western University (London, Canada) and a Juris Doctor in law from Queen’s University (Kingston, Canada).  She is also a registered patent agent.

Happy National STEM Day!

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Brion Raffoul wishes all the budding scientists, computer scientists, engineers, and mathematicians a Happy National STEM Day. Without STEM careers, patent law would not have developed to what we know it as today. If any budding scientists or engineers need some motivation to continue on the STEM path, here are some historical Canadian patents for inspiration!

For example, one of the first electric light prototypes (before Edison’s) was patented in 1874 by Canadian inventors Henry Woodward and Mathew Evans. Unable to secure investors, Woodward sold the rights to the US Patent to Edison in 1879. Edison later bought a share in the Canadian rights.

By Stacey Dunn

Happy Canadian Thanksgiving from the team at Brion Raffoul!

Brion Raffoul will be closed on October 14, 2019 for Canadian Thanksgiving. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office is also closed, so any patent or industrial design deadlines falling on October 12 to 14, 2019 are extended to October 15, 2019.

The New Gold Rush: Open Innovation in Canada

“It’s impossible for any organization to have all the best ideas”

~ General Electric, Open Innovation Manifesto

Open Innovation as an R&D strategy may seem counter-intuitive; traditional corporate culture dictates the use of secret R&D labs that operate in an information silo. However, open innovation can offer many competitive advantages, such as complimenting your company’s internal skills and know-how with external knowledge and ideas, lowering R&D costs, and increasing differentiation in the market.

For example, in 2000, the Canadian gold mining company Goldcorp Inc. crowdsourced gold prospecting in an under-performing mine; Goldcorp knew they were sitting on a literal and figurative gold mine but their geologists could not find the main deposits of gold. Goldcorp created a challenge for the general public; they released all Goldcorp’s geological data (going back as far as 1948) and offered $575,000 in prize money to the innovators that could find the elusive gold deposits. At the time, this type of open innovation was contrary to traditional mining practices: Goldcorp was admitting they were unable to find the gold and was releasing all their proprietary data. However, Goldcorp’s challenge led to more than 110 gold deposits that yielded over $6 billion worth of gold.

So, if that doesn’t answer why open innovation is a worthy consideration for any business, consider that patent filings in Canada have not increased significantly in the past ten (10) years. However, this stagnation is not an issue of lack of funding. Indeed, statistics from Industry Canada indicate that Canada is second only to the United States when it comes to venture capitalist funding.


Collaboration between companies and with the public at large should be considered to invigorate innovation in Canada. In another successful example of open innovation, Bombardier held a contest to solicit urban mobility designs. They created a social media open innovation community integrated with live, offline workshops. The contest rules stipulated that the winners must transfer their IP to Bombardier in exchange for a small prize. Bombardier also kept a right of first refusal for a year for all non-winning ideas. By creating a community around innovation, even outside their company, Bombardier created a sense of self-determination and pride in the community, that resulted in innovation pouring into Bombardier. Indeed, Bombardier received input from 2,486 participants from 102 countries that contributed 4,239 designs, 25,979 evaluations, 8,565 comments and 3,445 messages on Bombardier’s proposed urban transportation projects. As a bonus to uncovering a gold mine of innovation, Bombardier customers were very receptive to their more open and customer-orientated brand.

However, it is important to note that “open” innovation does not necessarily mean the innovation is in the public domain; the devil is in the details. IP ownership provisions should be clearly outlined in an agreement between all involved parties. The following questions can be helpful in outlining the preferred ownership details:

  • Who will own the IP stemming from the project (foreground IP)?
    • What about jointly created IP (joint ownership/management of IP assets should be approached with caution)?
    • Consider motivation factor for crowdsourcing when innovators own their IP?
    • Does a royalty-free license in perpetuity make sense given the motivations of the IP owner (i.e., the company or the innovator)?
  • What IP do the innovators and the company already own (background IP)?
  • Who owns the feedback stemming from the project?
  • Should a right of first refusal be included for IP that is not exploited during the project?

The bottom line: open innovation can be a great way to invigorate innovation within your company without resorting to a significant increase in R&D funding.

Ms. Dominique Lambert to attend BIO International Convention from June 3-6

Ms. Dominique Lambert will be representing the patent team at the BIO International Convention (BIO) being held in Philadelphia from June 3 to June 6, 2019.

https://convention.bio.org/

BIO attracts 16,000+ biotechnology and pharma leaders who come together to discover new opportunities and promising partnerships, bringing together a wide spectrum of life science and application areas including drug discovery, biomanufacturing, genomics, biofuels, nanotechnology and cell therapy.